Blaming Starbucks Won’t Change Anything

I drink a lot of Starbucks coffee…a lot, and this past week I have been glued to my iPad reading all about the company’s recent PR nightmare.

Yes the story affects me, a terrible thing was done and yes, this an important conversation to have.  I could even boycott the brand like all of social media is urging customers to. But I won’t. While I understand and share the global anger over last week’s arrest of two African-American men at their local Starbucks; saying no to my Americano and mermaid cup is not going to resolve this deep rooted problem.

Sadly, the company currently faces its worst PR nightmare as people swear off its lattes and macchiatos. Protesters have appeared in public, on TV, inside stores, around street corners and on every nook of the internet. ‘Starbucks is Anti-Black’ and ‘Shame on Starbs’ tweets fill my feed. ‘Boycott Starbucks’ they all demand.

But here’s how I see it, Starbucks most certainly isn’t the problem. Deep rooted implicit racism is. It cannot be argued, that every day countless African-Americans are at the receiving end of implicit racial bias. Sadly their stories never get told, their experiences don’t make it to CNN and most certainly don’t take up space on your social media feed. These people probably deal with everyday racism routinely. If you notice the body language of the two men in the Starbucks video, you cannot help the feeling that this has probably happened to them before, it isn’t as big a deal to them as it was to the upper-middle class, white soccer mum who shot and tweeted the video. To them, racism is probably routine, and what happened, could have happened to them at any other location, restaurant, grocery store, school or medical facility in America. The circumstances change,  but the story never does. It’s merely coincidental that this time it unfolded at a Starbucks.

Months later when the public outcry has moved to the next big story,  America will still be a nation infected with the same idiocy with its elected President – a racist who continues to judge people’s intentions and worth from the color of their skin.

In all these years, it has never come to light that the company has a corporate culture of being condescending to its Black customers. If that is ever revealed to be true then Starbucks deserves what’s coming to it. Until then, what happened in Philadelphia, is the same as what happened to Trayvon Martin, it is also the reason why black actors rarely receive nominations at the Oscars and it is for this same reason countless other African Americans  fight everyday injustices. The only difference is their stories remain untold, perhaps snuffed out by sighs or tears into a pillow or over gloomy dinner-table conversations.

Yes this is an embarrassing moment for Starbucks, but the company will come out ok. On the other hand this is a decisive moment for America, an important conversation is taking place but I am not sure things will change any time soon.

So like many loyal customers across the world, I will wait and watch as the company initiates damage control, trains its staff and reviews its policies. But sitting here in the tanned leather recliner of my local Starbucks at Al Ain Mall, I am certain of this – racism is America’s problem to fix, and blaming Starbucks is not going to change anything.

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