The Eighties’ Child – Guest Blog by Melissa Payne

We, the eighties’ children, are a strange bunch. We long for the simplicity of the past and the technology of tomorrow. Born at a time when every house didn’t have a television and landlines were a mark of social status, we have seen cable television, the mobile phone and credit cards sweep the nation.
Born in pre-liberalisation India, foreign goods were scarce, and the thus the arrival of foreign relatives was a much waited for event. We know what it is, not to have, and what it means to own. For most of us born into the middle class at this time, we were taught early that life was hard. Caned and punished at school, we were taught not to fuss, but to overcome. When I look around at the millennials I know, I am struck by the quality of endurance I see. I am amazed at those who have struggled out of poverty and dysfunctional homes, to be stable individuals with careers and families. I am aware too, of the tremendous need that millennials carry for things to ‘be real’. We are unfazed by the spit and polish, by the ‘show’ that enthralled previous generations or the superficiality that stupefies the next. We long for that which is ‘real’. That which fulfills.
The millennial is tired today. Tired of strategy, tired of the constant packaging of hard truth to tickle one’s ears. Tired of empty schemes that don’t fulfill. Disillusioned by authority figures of the previous generation. When we see corruption, we will not have it explained away. We will not put our heads in the sand, we cannot close our eyes to the evil that stares us in the face. We cannot ‘unsee’ what we have seen. We cannot pretend it doesn’t concern us. We, cannot separate the message and the messenger. Instead, we must react, we must have an opinion. We must make change. We will have justice. This generation has ground in its heels and refuses to go quietly into the night. Don’t shut us down or count us out. Call on us that we may build with you. We have seen the promises and the pitfalls of the transitioning era. How good ideas and intentions ran aground, causing more damage than they did good. We have learned the bitter lesson that everything new is not good. We started out naive, but have seen much; much that has turned us away from the decision makers of the previous generation. We are aware that heroes have feet of clay and that the strongest have weak moments. Our champions have fallen off their pedestals and lie in the dust beneath… Yet, in the midst of all this, we hope. We hope that change is possible, that the tide will turn, that sleeping consciences will awaken and be appalled by bad things happening in good places. We hope that justice will be done. We hope for tomorrow.
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One thought on “The Eighties’ Child – Guest Blog by Melissa Payne

  1. True. I think growing up in the late eighties and early nineties was the best time. We have seen, experienced a lot. That was also the golden era of Indi-pop, that was the time when computers were introduced to schools and we had to enter leaving our shoes behind 😀 Your post made me nostalgic!

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