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”All readers are aspiring writers in a way…”

I have just finished my second reading of ‘Norwegian Wood’ by Haruki Murakami. I first read it a year and a half ago after I had acquired it on Aamzon while searching for Paulo Coelho’s ‘Manuscripts Found in Accara’.  The choice seemed random, yet something told me to purchase it instead. ‘Norwegian Wood’ was an immersive experience. Nothing can prepare you for the way a Murakami plot (or lack of) can grab you and pull you in.

My first reading of Norwegian Wood was not as great as my second. At first I think I perceived it to be just pointless surrealism. As a result, I was always uncomfortable afterwards because I continue to profess Murakami as one of my favorite contemporary authors, yet, I greatly disliked one of his most celebrated works. However, the second time around was better. This time I could see more beauty in Murakami’s prose. There were moments when I read sections that gave me that same uneasy feeling that I had encountered before but I was able to find more to love in the novel than previously.

I’ve rambled on in prior posts about why I love reading Murakami’a works and I am certainly not in a mood to attempt a post-reading analysis on this one. What I did come away with (despite a sense of utter helplessness for Toru ) is a sense of awe for Murakami.

The man is a master wordsmith, weaving words into thoughts that can reach your sub-conscious mind without any effort at all. Despite the loose ends that mark Murakami’s works, the stories shine like stars because those cut strings add to the fantasy of it all. Using exceptional descriptions and dialogue, Murakami conveys the deepest, darkest—often hidden—sides of human nature. Many of his characters experience a type of universal, human despair that forces them to question reality. His stories are profound and bizarre at the same time leaving readers with a feeling that is, well – indescribable.

But here’s the thing, when Haruki sat down to write ‘The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle’, he didn’t have a plan. When Margaret Atwood wrote The Handmaid’s Tale, she didn’t know what was going to happen or how it would end. Perhaps, when I sit down to write my story…

inzDon’t get me wrong: I’m not comparing myself with these literary greats, not in terms of talent. But it does give me comfort and succor to know that I’m not the only person who starts simply with an idea, an image, a sentence, and that’s it.

Someone told me this morning that at our core, every passionate reader is an aspiring writer too. That’s certainly true of me and my hope is that in the process of writing and re-writing, I’ll discover a story along the way as well.

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